The Victories of an Autism Kid

So it has been a bit since we talked about Antonio and his progress with his new program. I have had a hard time behind the scenes with what happened, but I am confident and couldn’t be happier with the way things are playing out.

I have learned SO much from this new place he is at, and I think that’s the most important thing. If I am not learning, is he learning? If I can’t implement at home, is it even worth the money?

We don’t need to have weekly or bi-weekly meetings because it is THAT good. We communicate a lot, and we have progress reports every day and have an app to interact through. I also email with any questions or concerns.  

Everyone has seen SO much of a difference since he started his new program it makes me so happy that I want to cry.

Here are a few quick things that we are mastering at his applied behavior analysis:

  1. Sign Language: We know about ten things now! We can communicate his wants and needs on a daily basis. It really DOES work!
  2. He Stops: We tell him STOP, and he actually does it. This behavior is huge because before I was worried that he couldn’t walk in parking lots without holding my hand. Now, I feel better.
  3. He Waits: We can count to make him wait. He understands, is patient, and gets whatever he asks for based on his sign language.
  4. He Waves Hi and Bye: We worked hard on this for so long his wave is SOO cute. It’s like a pinched hand.
  5. Imitate Sounds: We get in his face and make sounds, noises, and make funny faces to help get his verbalized vocals going. This accomplishment is super huge, and it has been amazing to see how involved he is.
  6. More Interaction: We can interact more with other kids and people. He can sit still for long periods of time, and enjoy a book or iPad together without getting distracted.
  7. He’s Independent: He carries his backpack and lunchbox now every day to school. This victory makes me so happy.

All of these things took so much time for us to master, but it was so worth it! All of these took some time to learn for him and myself but it is seamless now. We keep meeting our weekly goals and it is so incredible. Even though he isn’t talking it is such a relief knowing that we are making the progress that I hoped for, for so long. 

The thing is that he doesn’t always need someone to say Antonio say Hi (wave). I can say Bye Antonio, and he knows to wave! I think that speaks volumes. These are all endless goals that we have been waiting for and wanting for literally months.

These might seem like they should have happened a long time ago because of his age, but this takes a lot of time with an autism kid. They think so different than other kids that it takes them a different way to learn. 

autismvictories

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Tips to Help Your Autistic Child Survive the Holidays

Parties are always a hard time for an autistic child. I know my son gets overwhelmed for festivities or in large groups. He will start to stim and be “in his world.” Plus, he will not interact with anyone, and people wonder what is wrong with him or why he doesn’t say “hi” to them.

I wanted others to understand that it is okay, and here are some great tips to cope.

  1. Prepare Your Child: Keep your child updated. Let them know months before and the time leading up to the party. Reiterate to them weeks and days prior so that they understand and can ready themselves for the celebrations. I let my son use his ‘calendar planner.’
  2. Choose a Familiar Venue: This step might be tough, but try to make it as easy as possible. We live out of town, but still visit grandma and grandpa’s home often. Let your child know if they need to travel (like we do), how long it will take to get there, and where it will be taking place. Help them prepare by stating “remember when we went here.”  I let my son play on his ipad.
  3. Limit the Number of Guests: This point may also be difficult to do, but know that you need to have a list and let your family/friends know that if they can limit the number of attendees, it might benefit your child better. Help your child be ready for the guests by saying, “remember your cousin, Billy.”
  4. Stick to Your Party End Time: Keep festivities short and sweet. Too much party time can cause your child overstimulation or aggression. I always tell my son we have x minutes, and we will be going home at x time. This acknowledgment allows him to enjoy himself before we leave. Reassuring any child with autism is always the best measure so that they can cope before the action happens.
  5. Maintain Your Schedule: Having a schedule at a celebration can happen. Try to keep eating on track. Bring some snacks or a meal so that your child doesn’t get upset if necessary.

All of these factors might be hard to accomplish, but try to prepare your child as much as you can. Sticking to this checklist can improve and brace them mentally.

austim holidays

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Best Sensory Toys for Kids with Sensory Processing Issues and Autism

Sensory toys are toys that provide the particular sensory input that many children with autism crave. Whether it is visual or tactile, the toys have the power to capture our kids’ attention, making the right sensory toy a powerful reinforcer (reward) in applied behavioral analysis (ABA) programs.

Does your child with autism have issues with sensory input? Perhaps he/she would benefit from sensory-based intervention tools such as sensory toys. Take a look at some of the top sensory toys for autism recommended by many occupational therapists to include fidget spinners, hand toys, chew toys, cubes, and sensory rings for children with autism.

Here are the top sensory items:

  1. JVIGUE Sensory Toys Set- 15 Pack Stress Relief Hand Fidget Toys for Kids and Adults, Sensory Therapy Toys for ADHD Autism Stress Anxiety 
    FIDGET TOYS VALUE PACK: Total 15 Pack of Fidget Toys,2xSqueeze Soybean Fidget Toys;2x Silver finger Massage Rings;2x Gold finger Massage Rings;1x Squeeze Grape Ball;3x Mesh And Marble Sensory Toy;2x Fidget Stretchy String;1x World Map Foam Balls;1x Monkey Stringy Balls;1 Pack Large Water Beads.
  2. Bapon Fidget Bag – Includes 14 Bundle Sensory Toys – Relieves Stress, Anxiety, Anti-Depression and Increases Focu 14-PIECE FIDGET SET. Providing tactile, visual and auditory stimulation, this set includes an 8-inch rain maker. three stretchy strings, three fuzzy poms, a bubble glass, a green bean and five water ball bottles, all stored inside a reusable drawstring bag.
  3. SpringFly 030 12 Pack Bundle Sensory Fidget Cube/Bike Chain/Liquid Motion Timer/Rainbow Magic Ball/Mesh and Marble Toy/Soybeans Squeeze Grape  Liquid Motion Timer Bubbler Is a Perfect Fidget Toy For Calming The Brain Down. The Descending Bubbles And The Mix Of Two Soft Colored Bubbles Have A Soothing And Mesmerizing Effect That Will Keep Kids Entertained For Hours and Helps Improve Visual Tracking Skills. It’S Great For Kids With ADHD, Autism, Emotional Disturbances, And Any Kid Who Has A Meltdown!
  4. National Geographic Play Sand – 2 LBS of Sand with Castle Molds and Tray (Blue) – A Kinetic Sensory Activity  SENSORY SAND – This sand is kinetic, so it sticks only to itself and not to you! This perpetually “wet” sand is perfect to mold, shape, and squeeze
  5. YoYa Toys Pull, Stretch & Squeeze Stress Balls by 3 Pack – Elastic Construction Sensory Balls – Ideal For Stress & Anxiety Relief, Special Needs, Autism, Disorders & More PREMIUM PULL & STRETCH BALL SET: If you are looking for great and effective ways to reduce stress and at the same time have some fun, then we got you covered. We proudly present you the best squeeze ball set that will become your favorite companion from this day on and will allow you to play around no matter where you are, no matter what you are doing.
  6. Sensory Ring and Fidget Toy | Soft, Flexible Ring and Rubber Spikes | Helps Reduce Stress and Anxiety| Promotes Focus and Clarity | Children, Youth, Adults Sensory Toys  SENSORY STIMULATION TO REDUCE STRESS–Offering a tactile feel that helps reduce stress and anxiety, these handheld stress-relief toys provide tactile stimulation to reduce a racing mind so you can keep restless hands busy.
Sensory toys are toys that provide the particular sensory input that many children with autism crave. Whether it is visual or tactile, the toys have the power to capture our kids' attention, making the right sensory toy a powerful reinforcer (reward) in applied behavioral analysis (ABA) programs.
Sensory toys are toys that provide the particular sensory input that many children with autism crave. Whether it is visual or tactile, the toys have the power to capture our kids’ attention, making the right sensory toy a powerful reinforcer (reward) in applied behavioral analysis (ABA) programs.

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Focusing on Your Child’s Strengths for Success

Guest blog post by Jennifer Elia-

If you have a child with special learning needs, you know the frustration for trying to make progress. You are both working so diligently to find a solution and make it over the learning roadblock. At times it seems insurmountable. What do you do when your child’s education get derailed by struggle and you have exhausted your options?

You focus on their strengths and let go of what isn’t working!

The Counterintuitive Success Formula

In a society driven by stats,  data, and success the answer to a problem is always try harder. Right? Wrong!

Drilling math facts for two hours instead of one is not the solution. We want to fill gaps with more of what is missing, but instead of filling the valleys, I propose you need to build longer bridges.

When it comes down to it, every person has strengths and weaknesses. Some may be more obvious but it exists in every human being. Special needs children are no different.

Not Different, But Amazingly Unique

In fact, special needs children are different, just each and every person. Our difference is what makes us special–not our high grades, our prestigious job titles, or our award winning talents. What makes us each special is that every one of us is different. Those differences work together to create a pretty amazing world.

Just like a tapestry, we each have a thread of life to share. Sure the crimson thread is more noticeable, but the white and gray threads give the picture definition. The beige adds depth and light. Take out any one color no matter how noticable it is in the complete work and the masterpiece becomes second rate.

Start with What Is Good

Everyone needs some basic knowledge to get through life, there is no denying that. Completely abandoning math or social skills would not be advisable for anyone. However, we are more than what we cannot do!

Just as no one should be defined by a diagnosis, our life should not be defined by our weakest moments, by our biggest struggles, nor by our current flaws. No one is perfect.

Focusing, as is typical, on what needs work creates an environment of defeat instead of success.

You paint beautifully but you still have not learned your times tables. Obviously, you need to paint less and spend your afternoons doing flashcards.

Have you or your child ever been in that situation? There is a passion and a gift that is beautifully blooming, but the glaring deficit is all you can see. STOP!

Start from A Place of Strength

Before building a system to overcome whatever is holding your child hostage in his educational journey, create an environment for him to enjoy what sets him free. It does not have to be academic if the struggle is academic. It does not have to be physical if the struggle is physical. It just has to be his passion and unique gift.

Give your child a taste of success and enjoyment, make that a priority as you bolster the needs and wants. Here are some examples:

  1. Your child has an unbridled passion for horses (pun intended) but reading a simple sentence is as difficult as emptying the Atlantic with a spoon. So, you take some time to learn more about horses, sign up for riding lessons, and turn science into an equine anatomy study.
  2. Your child is Miss Personality, her outgoing and loving nature attracts everyone to her, and in her spare time she hosts pretend radio shows for her stuffed animals, however her gross motor skills are far behind age level. So, you set up a podcast channel on Itunes and help her market her first podcast to family and friends.
  3. Your son is a math genius, his fascination with solving equations as big as your house is mind-blowing, but his interpersonal skills are lacking and he struggles in group settings. So, you employ find an open access class online through Harvard and let him try his hand at being one of the youngest kids in the class.

Abandoning The Struggle for The Strength

None of these actions will erase what is causing your child to struggle. Their needs are still very present, and require assistance and support. However, they will give your child that taste of victory in being who they were meant to be!

On of my favorite quotes is from St Catherine of Siena,”Be who you were meant to be and you will set the world afire!”

Can you imagine the world set afire by your child? Yes, the first child will need Orton Gillingham intervention. Sure, the second child requires physical and occupational therapy. Most definitely, the third child needs social skills and coaching on how to interact with others. However, one of that should ever define any of them.

When life get overwhelming because of special needs, focus on the special, not the need. Taking a short break, whether it be days or months depending upon the situation, and allowing the child to just be who she was meant to be will help diffuse the frustration and allow that special, unique, amazing little person of yours to show the world what she is really made of!

About the author: Jennifer Elia, homeschool mentor, curriculum creator, blogger, and author, is Founder of Aurelius Cabrini Homeschool Resource Center which is dedicated to giving homeschool moms the tools they need to thrive in their home education career. Jennifer provides one-on-one mentoring, personalized and original curriculum plans, and practical advice for those just beginning their homeschool journey, as well as those who just need a little boost. She lives in New Jersey with her husband and four children whom she has been educating at home for the past 10 years. When Jennifer isn’t busy researching the best curriculum solutions, she enjoys gardening, crafting, and writing. You can find Jennifer on Facebook and Pinterest.

Focusing on Your Child's Strengths for Success

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Asthma in Toddlers, How To Cope

Antonio was diagnosed with asthma about a year ago. We had two-three episodes where he had to be hospitalized for a few days. We had to put him on an inhaler for a long time, and we started to wean him off of it because he was doing better overall and got through some of the sick seasons without issues.

We were doing fine, alright. We went about five months off of Antonio’s inhaler when we had an episode. He was starting to get sick on and off but was acting normal. You know how sometimes being sick is crazy and unpredictable. Well, I picked him up from school, and he had a cough, the cough was worse than the day before. We went home, and usually, he takes a nap on the way home. This time he took a nap, but it was short. He woke up as soon as we got home and he was coughing horribly (almost like a choking cough) and couldn’t go back to sleep.

My husband was away for the day and wasn’t going to be home for a little while, so it was up to me to do this on my own. We came inside and tried to do activities, but he just seemed SOO tired and out of it. He started to cough more; the cough at this time was a dry cough. He didn’t have much of an appetite (which is SO unusual for him). By the end of the night, his cough worsened, and he was coughing up gunk. I started to give him his emergency inhaler, cough syrup, Tylenol, and even Claritin. He has horrible allergies and sinuses just like me.

I was worried about him going to bed; I just had a feeling. When your child coughs like that, you constantly worry if they are going to choke or stop breathing. He kept trying to fall asleep but waking up due to his cough. It was a LONG NIGHT. I brought him into my bed because he couldn’t fall asleep, and I wanted to monitor him. I thought I could get some sleep monitoring him. All that said, I started to worry more. He was wheezing and gasping for air. I was on the phone with my dad, and he said “Susie, what do you think? Don’t you think his breathing is kinda bad?” I said yeah, but no one wanted to believe me. I knew he was off and it started hours ago, but I couldn’t prevent it from happening.

It’s one of those things where it has to take its course. SO, I didn’t even think twice, hopped in the car, and took him to the ER. We were in the ER for about 4 hours (till 3 AM!). The staff did a lot of breathing treatments (with a nebulizer) and then gave him some breathing steroids. It was a LONG LONG LONG LONG LONG NIGHT. I don’t even know how we stayed up that late.

Finally, they said, “You need to go to Akron Children’s Hospital and get admitted for the night.” I tried talking myself and them out of it mainly because I wanted to sleep. I said okay let’s just go. They put him in an ambulance while I ran home to get an overnight bag and let the dogs out (again, my husband was gone, so I was the caretaker).

Once I arrived, I was panicked. I didn’t know where my son was, the hospital was all locked up (which is good), but I literally couldn’t get in or find my son!!! It was so quiet and dead during the 4 am rush. I was worried… Is my son here? Is he sleeping? Did he throw tantrums? Did he scream the whole way? What was really going on? I just want to sleep. My hands are full. All these thoughts running through my mind.

I finally got to his room and let out a sigh of relief. He was SOUND ASLEEP. The ambulance ride put him right to sleep. I was so worried that he would need me, or be scared, but he wasn’t!  The nurses said he was a champ. I won’t get into too much detail about asthma because it is complicated. I crashed hard for the night and relaxed finally knowing that my son was in good hands and recovering.

They kept giving tons of treatments through out the night. People kept coming in and getting vitals. The saying is you won’t get any sleep while you are in the hospital. I felt this. I woke up next morning, knowing that we could go home soon. BUT, he wasn’t passing his tests for breathing.. I thought he was fine, but it was better safe than sorry. It was better to leave it to the professionals…

We had to stay ANOTHER NIGHT. There were lots of things happening, and, again, I won’t get into much detail. But, I realized that Akron Children’s Hospital took incredible care of us.

Here are the elements I liked the most about our stay at Akron Children’s Hospital:

  • The food…

Hospital food isn’t horrible. We were able to order food up to our room for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. We had access to the kitchen on the floor so that we could get other food at any time as well as drinks. There were so many options to choose from for food! It even had healthy and heart recipes noted on their menu.

  • The people…

The people were the NICEST and answered all of my questions. This instance wasn’t his first time for admittance, but I still needed my nerves to be calmed, so I kept asking questions. Talking to people calm me down and I needed this at that moment in time.

  • The overall feeling…

I felt safe, secure, and on top of the world. The hospital isn’t meant to be fun by any means, but I honestly can say that we were taken care of and had the best two days there considering. I left the facility knowing that my son was well-provided for, and they REALLY did care.

All in all, here is something that I took away from this horrible visit:

Always follow your gut and motherly instinct. I second guessed myself and tried to explain it to my husband and parents; they didn’t understand because they weren’t there. I kept talking myself out of going to the hospital, but I needed to go.I knew I needed to, but kept trying to talk myself out it. I was so glad that I was able to take him to the ER.
antonio asthama

 

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Three Simple Ways to Cut Down on Homework Meltdowns

Three Simple Ways to Cut Down on Homework Meltdowns

Tears well in eyes, heads lay on tables, and your family hits their breaking point yet again. Nothing can bring down the mood of an evening quite like a homework meltdown.. I assure you that you aren’t alone in this struggle. Many students and families endure this nightly battle more often than they would like.

I would love to see the homework policies in our country change to make it less of a burden on families and students. I don’t know exactly what this would look like, but I do know that what we’re doing now isn’t really working.

 

Until homework becomes more flexible for students and families, let’s aim for less meltdowns. Through many years working with kiddos and families on their assignments, I’ve compiled a list of three easy ways you can help your child have less homework stress, while learning more from their after school studies.

  1. Take Frequent Breaks

Studies have found that kids can focus their age plus or minus one minute. So, for example, a six year old will be able to focus for around 5-7 minutes. Making sure your child is taking frequent breaks ensures they’re able to spend more time focusing in that “sweet spot” without burning out and losing attention completely.

In my opinion, the best homework breaks involve movement because they allow your child to get up from their seat while the physical activity refreshes and refocuses their brain. For a kiddo who has been expected to sit still all day in school, this can be so refreshing! During a break, allow your child to run a lap around the house, do jumping jacks, stretch, dance, or move their body in any way they enjoy. Youtube has some great kids “brain breaks” that would be a fun addition to your homework routine if you’re looking for ideas.

Put it into action: Set a timer for 5-15 minutes (depending on your child’s attention span) and let them get to work on their assignments. When the timer goes off, get up and take a 2-5 minute break, then take a couple of breaths and re-focus on the task at hand (and re-set your timer).

  1. Have Supplies on Hand

When doing homework and projects, finding the supplies can be half the battle. You can cut down on the time spent doing homework, and the time you spend getting looking for pencils, by creating a homework supplies basket. Having all supplies available in one place will help your child stay focused without having to get up and search for something every few minutes.

Put it into action: Find a caddy or basket that will look nice in your homework area. Gather all the supplies that your child typically needs for homework and projects (ex. paper, pencils, glue, scissors, crayons etc.) and place them in the container. Explain to your child that before pestering you for scissors they should look in the basket!

  1. Think Outside the Box

Chances are, your child sits still at a desk or table under fluorescent lighting for a majority of the day. This can make sitting still to study and do homework seem super unappealing when they get home. To help cut down on the drudgery and meltdowns, try to step outside the box whenever possible.

Thinking outside the box when it comes to homework can be as simple as an alternate location (such as doing it outside, at a coffee shop, or in a different room of the house). When studying, you can go outside and play a game of HORSE, pass a ball back and forth, or encourage your child to create their own spelling hopscotch game. Stepping outside the ordinary doesn’t have to cost a lot of time or money, and doing something a little different can help your child retain information and have fun while doing it!

Put it into action: Choose one day this week to step out of your normal homework routine to do something a little different.

Bonus: Know When to Quit

Homework shouldn’t be a battle every night, and it shouldn’t reduce your child to tears. If homework is getting tense too often, don’t force it. I encourage you to let your child stop when they are at their capacity. Make sure to reach out to the teacher to discuss options for making sure homework doesn’t push your child over the edge every night.

I hope that these simple hacks help your family have a more pleasant experience with homework this school year. How does your family make homework easier on everyone involved? We would love to hear your tips in the comments!

Three Simple Ways to Cut Down on Homework Meltdowns

Bio: Zoie is the founder and lead tutor at Hoffman Tutoring Group, an online tutoring company that serves students in K-8th grade. Her passion for personalized learning stems from her own experience as a struggling elementary school student. She dedicates her time to ensuring students get the education and mindset building they need to meet their academic goals by matching them with qualified tutors who plan sessions specifically for each child’s needs, personality, and learning style.

Website: www.hoffmantutoringgroup.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/hoffmantutoring

Instagram: www.instagram.com/hoffman.tutoring.group/

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Why Sign Langugage Matters

It has been a while since I wrote about our autism progress. Quite frankly, I don’t remember where we left off. A lot has changed; we started a new program. This program is fantastic, but at first, I was so bent out of shape and cried. I was scared that it wouldn’t work after having a bad experience with the previous one.

I was in denial, I was hopeful, I had to push ALL my feelings aside and be a mother. I had to get my act together so that my son could move forward. I didn’t have time to think and be mad. I put everything aside and was open minded.

I was impressed with how structured this place was and how they had great communication. But besides that, I was able to learn a lot more about autism. It’s important to understand all you can and ask questions. It’s essential that they know his strengths, goals, and weaknesses. These were all great elements that the new place had.

The first thing that I noticed was that we kept track of progress. We are focusing on a lot of sign language, along with some other gross motor skills, but the sign language we learned was implemented at home immediately. We kept data on how many times he signed without us showing him and how many times he did it on his own when he wanted it without us asking.

For example cookie – show me cookies (he shows the sign for cookie). Independent is when he can show cookie when he wants one and not when we prompt him.

All of these signs help us communicate, and not get frustrated, but also know what he wants. Before, we never knew what he wanted. We are continually making noises and sounds, even with the sign language, so that we can take away the sign language in a few months and get him to be verbal hopefully.

The fact that he understands all of this makes me feel like the proudest mother ever. And, that he can communicate and tell us what he wants makes life so much easier for us both; from this moment on, I realized that we are on the same page and doing alright. So, yes,I am glad I made the decision that I did and pushed aside all the personal problems.

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Check out some of our other autism posts:

WHY YOUR CHILD NEEDS A SPORT, ACTIVITY, OR PRESCHOOL

HOW SIGN LANGUAGE HAS HELPED US

BIRTHDAY GIFTS FOR THREE YEAR OLD TODDLERS

 

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Autism: Positive Parenting Makes the Difference

Life has a tendency to throw a lot at us. We all are going through some obstacle at one point or another and manage to pull it all together. I see this more and more everyday. When my son was diagnosed with autism, I felt lost and sorry for us. I wanted people to feel sorry for us. I felt like I was alone and no one else could understand.

Then, I started to notice so many people, moms included, going through their own struggles. I witnessed people going through infertility and felt bad for them. I observed moms who’s kids had been sick or in ICU after birth. We all face some hardship in our lives and should not compare each person’s problems. Every issue is so different and unique that we can’t say “oh she doesnt understand what I am going through or even care.”

DSC_6792

People tell me all the time I am so positive. Well, why should we be negative? I try to make the best of a situation whenever I can and stop being so hard on myself and those around me. The truth is that I am so hard on people sometimes. I am so hard on Antonio’s teachers.. my parents.. my husband… even Antonio. All because we can’t get him to talk or make the progress that he needs. So what do I do? I take my frustration out on someone else by being rude, mean, or just thinking I know it all (but I don’t).

Recently, I wasn’t happy with Antonio’s progress. I decided to take matters into my own hands. I literally hold him like a baby and let him watch my lips while I make different noises or sounds. Next, I allow him to imitate me to get the results that I want. I thought, “it can’t be that hard. Why aren’t they doing it at his speech?”

But there is one difference here… I am his mom. I am able to give him that comfort and love. I am his best friend. I am his go to person. He tried so hard to do all the things that I was doing. He made good progress. I again was wondering why they couldn’t get anywhere with him? I knew it was because I had the advantage of being his mom.

The other element I add is to be loud… and I make sure to really be annoying trying to get him to talk. I am silly and loud all the time. I don’t care if people look at us or laugh, etc. It is what works for us. I narrate situations constantly so he can understand and at least try to communicate whenever possible.

See, we all have some challenge and are all hard on one another. Just live in the moment and get excited when some small success happens. When Antonio made the same noise back, I gave hugs and kisses and he was super happy and smiling. Who cares about blaming someone. At the end of the day, we are all trying and have the same goal.

Shop Autism Things:

 

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Parenting is Scary and it Doesn’t Get Easier

They say having a kid changes your whole life and we can never prepare for parenthood. We can raise our kids to be the best or the smartest, but the truth is that once they grow up, they are out of our hands.

My son is only three years old, but I worry about everything. Lately, I couldn’t help but wonder what will come about when he is a teenager or even an adult. Will he understand all the situations he encounters? It is a tough world out there and we try so hard to make sure that they are prepared the best.

How do we prevent our kid from danger or wrong decisions? How do we let them learn and be the best? How do we explain all the rights and wrongs? How do we instruct them on dangerous aspects? How do we teach them about sex? I mean, let’s be honest.

All these questions run through my head. Though we have enough time before we have to worry about these topics, I want to be prepared as a parent when the time comes. I know one thing, being a parent means we go with the flow and surprise ourselves a lot because we know more than we think we do!

Truthfully, we as parents can only do our best. Once our children become adults, we hope that we have taught them everything they need to know to be successful when out on their own in the big, wide world.

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  1. How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk
  2. The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child’s Developing Mind
  3. The Explosive Child: A New Approach for Understanding and Parenting Easily Frustrated, Chronically Inflexible Children

 

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Mom Thoughts About a Nonverbal Child

I wonder all the time, literally all the time, if talking will make it all better?? By that I mean would life be “easier?” Would speaking make our bond even stronger? Would we have better communication? I ponder so many things all day. I wish that I had the answers and the easy way out, but I don’t.

Talking will make everything else go away, right?? That’s what I think. His autism will just be gone and we can be “normal.” But, it will always be there; it will just present itself less and less. Hence why it is so important he gets all the help he can now rather than later.

If he can talk, he can do what other kids are doing and can truly try new things, right? Does that even matter? Will that really help? These are my thoughts… constantly… as I try to fill my head with answers and wonder what ‘talking’ will actually accomplish.

What if he’s able to start talking but doesn’t want to and would rather throw tantrums? Because, let’s be honest, such is the toddler life. Nothing else can be done. But then he talks back and a whole new issue arises, right?

Will he still stim if he can talk? Will he follow directions? What would it be like if he could speak? What really does being verbal achieve?!?

There’s more to it than just talking — that’s what I have to keep telling myself.

It’s a two way communication street. He has to understand and talk in order for it to be successful.

Let’s just live in the moment and focus on what’s in front of us. Let’s stop comparing and questioning. Let’s enjoy those snuggles and giggles that he still loves and hold on to each a little tighter because one day he will be older, he will get a bit embarrassed, and I won’t be able to get those hugs.

Shop some of our favorite autism activities.

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  1. Stages Learning Materials Language Builder Emotion Picture Cards Expressions, Conversation, and Situation Photo Cards for Autism Education, ABA Therapy
  2. Stages Learning Language Builder 9-Box Set Educational Flash Cards
  3. Stages Learning Materials Language Builder Picture Noun Flash Cards Photo Vocabulary Autism Learning Products for ABA Therapy and Speech Articulation

PS Check out these Amazing Cotton Baby Booties!  They are super fun and adorable. Plus they are brand new and are lightweight booties are made from 100% organic cotton. Don’t worry they are perfect for year-round wear. AND did I mention super comfy?!

** This post also contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links.

Read our disclosure.

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